Do you have Qi deficiency? Diet and Tips



2020-02-01 por Mudán Burgos

Do you have Qi deficiency? Diet and Tips

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, Qi is the vital force or energy. Everything in the world is composed of Qi, including the physical body and the feelings that any person harbors.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, Qi is the vital force or energy. Everything in the world is composed of Qi, including the physical body and the feelings that any person harbors. Followers and practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine believe that to have a balanced life and free of physical or mental health problems, a person must have a balanced qi.
Diseases or other conditions only appear when there is an imbalance or deficiency of qi in the body.

What are the symptoms?

Cold feet and hands
Fatigue and lethargy
Edemas
Swelling
Bad circulation
Slow digestion
Hypothyroidism
Poor appetite
Shallow breathing

Feeding tips according to the MTC:

• Live with a mainly vegetarian diet of light and simple meals.
• Eat mostly whole and unprocessed foods.
• Chew and swallow slowly.
• Relax while eating; Avoid eating while reading or watching TV.
• Eat regularly. The amount of food and the time of meals should be similar every day. Optimal is breakfast at 7 a.m., lunch at 13 noon and dinner at 7 p.m.
• Food intake should be higher in the morning, a moderate amount at lunch and a small amount at dinner.
• Eat small amounts of food frequently instead of large amounts of food infrequently.
• Avoid eating in any type of extreme emotional state.
• Eat moderately at each meal; Eat up to only 2/3 of our capacity, never full.
• Eat clean, fresh, organic and seasonally ripe products as often as possible.
• Avoid extremes in the diet, such as eating too hot, spicy, too raw, too cold or too greasy.
• Balance the five flavors; sour, bitter, sweet, spicy and salty, the best you can.
• Avoid eating something 2-3 hours before bedtime.

Specific advice for Qi deficiency:

Have:
Half of the total calories should come from grains and legumes, a third of vegetables, about 15 percent meat, but to avoid aggravating digestion, eat only 90 grams per serving.
Recommended foods include rice or barley broth, garlic, leeks, green beans, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds and carrots.

Avoid:
Cold or refreshing foods, tofu, milk, cheese, excessively sweet foods, liquids with meals, raw foods, salads, fruits and juices in excess.